Five Reasons Your Skin Loves Vitamin B

Five Reasons Your Skin Loves Vitamin B

Originally thought to be one single B Vitamin, it was discovered that there are actually eight different vitamins and they coexist in similar foods and serve slightly different purposes in the body. They're often utilized and supplemented together as "Vitamin B Complex." To make things easy, we'll just say "Vitamin B."

Break It Down

The eight individual B Vitamins making up B Complex are as follows: B1 thiamine B2 riboflavin B3 niacin B5 pantothenic acid B6 pyridoxine B7 biotin B9 folate (or folic acid if synthesized) B12 cobalamin They're all water-soluble and play important roles in cell metabolism. Some perform individualized tasks, while others work together almost synergistically through the body's systems to balance for overall health. The ones most closely related to skin health are B3, B6, and B12. Vitamin B is necessary for the proper functioning of almost every body process, especially metabolism, the nervous system, vital organs, eyes, muscles, skin and hair. Chances are, if you're suffering from skin issues, you may benefit from getting more B-Complex Vitamins. Just what can Vitamin B do for your skin? Here are our top reasons your skin should be a B-Team Cheerleader. . . .
  1. Anti-aging At Its BestVitamin B has been shown to improve the ability of the epidermis (the outer layer of skin) to retain moisture.

Vitamin B has been shown to improve the ability of the epidermis (the outer layer of skin) to retain moisture. Hydrated skin appears plumper and healthier. This reduces the formation of fine lines that can make skin appear older. As a result, this vitamin has become a cornerstone of, and one of the best, anti-aging ingredients, helping to reveal softer, smoother skin with less dryness and flakiness. A study by Bisset et al, presented at the Annual Meeting of Dermatology in 2003, demonstrated that a topical form of vitamin B was shown to dramatically reduce the effects of aging in human skin. When taken internally, it will also help to heal a damaged complexion from the inside out.

2. Antioxidants Rule

Vitamin B acts as an antioxidant that can help to maintain fresher, younger-looking skin by significantly reducing the effects of aging, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Antioxidants counteract damage caused by free radicals, which break down healthy cells and contribute to aging and disease.

3. Say No To Pimples

Vitamin B has shown the capability of reducing oil formation, thus reducing acne formation. Vitamin B has shown the capability of reducing oil formation, thus reducing acne formation. In addition, it can also help to minimize acne by helping the body break down oils in the form of triglycerides and cholesterol. Research conducted by the University of Maryland Medical Centre reported that dietary supplementation of Vitamin B5 helped to lower levels of triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood, indirectly promoting healthy skin.

4. Clearing Conditions

B Complex helps in the treatment of skin conditions such as Seborrheic dermatitis and rosacea. It can help to reduce general redness, scaliness, and other skin irritations, and has been shown to promote faster healing of skin wounds. Important in fighting eczema, Vitamin B helps to keep the skin smooth, reduce inflammation and relieve itching. It's also good for lowering stress levels, which can worsen eczema.

5. Color-Coordinated

B12, in particular, helps to regulate the skin's pigment production and location, making it an effective skin lightening agent. When applied over a period of time, it decreases hyper-pigmentation.

Where Can I Get It?

The highest content of Vitamin B can be found in fish. Salmon, trout, tuna, and cod seem to contain the highest amounts. We're not capable of producing vitamins on our own, so we depend on external sources like our foods. Since we have a limited capacity to store it, we must consume a high amount of Vitamin B to maintain proper function. Fortunately, all B vitamins are water-soluble, so you can't overdose on them, but a deficiency often leads to multiple health problems in a chain reaction of events. Vitamin B is delicate and easily destroyed, particularly by alcohol and cooking. Food processing will also reduce the content of B vitamins in foods. The highest content of Vitamin B can be found in fish. Salmon, trout, tuna, and cod seem to contain the highest amounts. Meats such as lamb, beef, poultry, eggs, and dairy foods will also contain higher quantities. Certain fruits, vegetables, and legumes are good sources, as well. Try to grab things like avocado, pomegranate, dates, watermelons, spinach, potatoes, squash, soy beans, kidney beans, and lentils.

What If I Don't Get Enough?

Vitamins are only required in very small quantities, but deficiencies can show up in big ways. Your skin is often times the first organ to show it. Since Vitamin B affects so many different body systems, a myriad of symptoms may arise in the case of a deficiency, but will show up almost immediately in your skin. It may manifest as cracked corners of the mouth, acne, sensitivity to sunlight, alopecia, dryness, wrinkles, rashes, or an uneven complexion. Most people who eat a well-rounded diet consisting of a large variety should get enough B Vitamins from food, but some people are at an increased risk of deficiency. Those affected are particularly people over the age of 50, take antacids, have celiac or Crohn's disease, gastritis, or other digestive disorders. Those that have undergone stomach or weight loss surgery, drink alcohol regularly, or follow a vegetarian diet may also be more prone.